Roche Limit – “We were taking steps sideways, not forward”

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RocheLimit_01-1 (1)

Roche Limit was supposed to be a stepping stone for greatness and human potential, but instead evolved into a sad, violent, lawless cess pool. It’s atmosphere is intangible, it’s inhabitants are ruthless, and there’s no way to escape it. Despite being surrounded by hopelessness in a destitute place, Sonya Hudson beings the search for her younger sister and recruits a criminal help her.

The world Moreci has built supercedes the actual narrative, which isn’t a bad thing. In following issues, I assume the character devlopement will take the front seat, but for now the most fascinating thing about the comic is the sociological implications of a isolated planetary mass run by criminals(Almost like Australia, but in space). About a quarter of first installment is exposition. We learn a lot about how Roche Limit has come to be, and then we are introduced to the protagonists, which is where it could be a little hard to get through.

Alex Ford and Sonya Hudson are presented as the protagonists. Sonya is a bad-ass on a quest, which I can get down with. When we first see her she unapologetically threatens to shake-down the customers at an establishment run by a (maybe) famous mobster. Alex Ford on the other hand is a smarmy, drug-dealing, bar-rat (So it would seem). I have no doubt that it will be revealed that Ford has a heart of gold, and is a lot smarter than we think he is, but so much of how he acts and what he says feels disingenuous.

Malhota has truly mastered the art of using negative space, which makes the visual storytelling compelling. Parts of the comic use colors that are meaningfully dull, which is a trait that isn’t appreciated enough. Sometime’s it can be confused with poor coloring, but the first few pages alone prove that that’s just not the case. There’s an experimental element to some of the colors and texture used that should make people excited. Specifically, there’s a really beautiful dream sequence that makes the entire issue worth it (Though, there is plenty to love).

As a premiere issue, it has my attention. The issues with it are easily eclipsed by the beautiful art and captivating premise. It’s been explained as a love child between 2001: A Space Odyssey and Blade Runner which are both exemplary models for hard sci-fi. It has a lot of promise.

Roche Limit is available in comic shops Wednesday 9/24

Ruben Ruiz

Ruben Ruiz

Movie buff, comic nerd, and fashion conscience male. -- I'm also deathly afraid of alligators.
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